High cholesterol diet trigger changes in immune system; leads to serious form of fatty liver disease

Researchers found how a toxic combination of dietary fat and cholesterol impacts the behaviour of macrophages, a type of white blood cell, in the liver.
Washington DC: Turns out, a high cholesterol diet can trigger changes in the immune system that can lead to a serious form of fatty liver disease. Known as non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), it eventually progresses to cirrhosis or liver cancer, especially in those with obesity or Type 2 diabetes.
Researchers at Keck School of Medicine found how a toxic combination of dietary fat and cholesterol impacts the behaviour of macrophages, a type of white blood cell, in the liver. The findings of the study are published in the Journal of Hepatology.
Using a mouse model, the study cascade was published in detail in the immune system events, which eventually leads to liver inflammation and scaring of the liver patients.
According to researcher Hugo Rosen, "Despite its increased expansion and understanding in the healthcare system, food and drug-administration-approved therapies are not available for any alcohol-based fatty liver disease." "Non-alcoholic fatty liver is an urgent need to better understand the causes of disease progression, so successful therapeutics can be designed and brought to clinical practice."
After feeding meat with different levels of fat and cholesterol, the group found harmful activity together with germs and bacterial control genes. Oxidized low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, especially in humans and mouse macrophages both with direct inflammation and square formation, change the gene expression. The group has identified a novel recycling macrophage that responds to inflammation.

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